Tag Archives: zenith

Watch Trends: Is 38mm The New 42mm, Just Asking?

There are more 38mm watches breaking cover right now than we can keep up with, so let’s have a look at some we missed over 2021. By the way is 38mm your preferred case diameter, or are still on the 2020 42mm wavelength?

Maybe both? Whatever, your preference post a comment if you like. Here are three random 38mm case watches we spotted online and you know what, they have a symmetry, a balance, that every watch fan can enjoy for years.

MAEN GREENWICH 38

The Swedish brand have a handsome 38mm watch called the Greenwich, which is let’s face it, the perfect name for a wristwatch. Or a clock.

“The Greenwich is the perfect travel watch with its GMT function and comfortable rubber Tropic strap. A custom integrated rubber strap is also available,” says Maen.

This model has superluminova and an oversized crown too, which is handy on a smaller watch.

ZENITH CHRONOMASTER 38

For us, the black/white Chronomaster 38mm is the pick of the bunch, as we find the green Poker thingie too gaudy and the blue/silver variations are kinda samey. Zenith have been mining their El Primero heritage far too long in our view, but this punchy, classic monochrome contrast dial ticks the right vintage boxes.

It just looks right, bit like the original El Primero. Not too pricey at £7100 compared to other special editions at 10K or more.

OMEGA SPEEDMASTER 38 ORBIS EDITION

This is a stand-out model in the 38mm Speedmaster range we think. The beige/brown models are kinda wishy-washy for us and the green/gold editions are a sort of 1970s throwback in the same way a green dralon settee is; fun for five minutes and then you wish you hadn’t wasted your money.

But this deep, rich blue dial watch, with its date window and 6pm looking like a card sharp shuffling the deck, and that wonderful poker style second hand – yeah, the business. It’s a mere trifle at £4,360 which is way cheaper than many other Speedmaster watches in the Omega Pantheon – can we say it’s a Pantheon? Probably.

 

 

 

Zenith Desert Storm – Another 50 Pieces in The Pipeline?

A limited edition Zenith El Primero/Defy is always like catnip for us here at NWC magazine.

Groovy beige strap,  beige sub-second dial trim, oh yes we like that, titanium case, beefy 45mm width, nice…oh heck, the price is £18,500. It’s a sell-out in the first 50 pieces, but you can add your name to the waiting list, so there could be another 50-100 next year.

OK, we can dream, here’s the word from Zenith;

Limited to just 50 examples, the DEFY Extreme Desert edition draws inspiration from the raw, elemental beauty of the desert. Crafted in titanium, the 1/100th of a second chronograph features Pusher protectors and bezel crafted in Falcon’s Eye gemstone, paired with a tinted sapphire dial with beige counters.

Zenith Needs to Stop Remixing The El Primero

Zenith has reworked their El Primero watch yet again. Smaller case, original dial colours and greater accuracy.

But it’s getting boring frankly, much as we love the classic 1969 design and many of the various El Primero revival models that Zenith has been offering since the 2019 anniversary year.

What you need to know;

There is an exact replica, 38mm steel case variant.

The rose gold case one looks ace. Expensive though.

We love the star detail on the crown.

Here’s the word on the latest iteration;

Original by name, original by substance. Few watches have been as influential and truly iconic as the Zenith A386, which made its debut in 1969 as one of the first steel watches to be equipped with the revolutionary El Primero calibre – the world’s first automatic high-frequency integrated chronograph movement.

Over 50 years later, the El Primero remains the benchmark of precision among automatic chronograph movements, giving way to new versions and iterations in a constant evolution of technicity (is that a made-up word?? – Ed) and performance.

While Zenith has paid tribute to many of its emblematic historical references, including gold versions of the A386 in its Chronomaster Revival collection that debuted during the El Primero’s 50th anniversary, a steel re-edition as part of the permanent Zenith collection has long been something that Zenith collectors and chronograph aficionados have been eagerly awaiting.

But beyond a modern reinterpretation of this enduring staple among chronographs, Zenith has gone a step further with the Chronomaster Original, which masterfully retains the singular and enduringly relevant design of the A386 while packing the performance of the 21st century version of the El Primero boasting 1/10th of a second precision and time measurement.

So the top spec gold case model is £16,000, and the steel case/leather strap version starts at £7,100.

Verdict; A classic El Primero is a better addition to your collection than a new model. Hardly any depreciation and you’re buying the watch that kinda changed everything, not a factory reproduction. It’s like buying an electric powered E-Type Jaguar, looks perfect but underneath it’s a different 21st century toy.

Zenith suffers huge depreciation in the UK market as collectors feel they are over-priced for what they are. They have a point. A Tudor Black Bay, Omega Speedmaster or Breitling Top Time do much the same job and for about half the price. The El Primero is in Rolex Sub territory in terms of price and the fact is, it simply cannot command that kind of RRP.

What Zenith needs is a watch that sells for about three grand, looks ultra fresh and modern and wins over new customers. Maybe work with design houses like Bamford London or produce some crossover branded watches using the Dior and Louis Vuitton names from within the group?

Fact is, Zenith has painted itself into a corener with the El Primero in exactly the same way Hublot has with the Big Bang, or AP has done with the Royal Oak. There is a real danger that many Swiss brands are essentially one hit wonders. And that spells long term decline.

Bowie didn’t stay Ziggy until he got his bus pass did he?

 

 

Are Factory Restorations The Next Big Thing?

We only ask the question because not every watch brand enjoys the market dominance of Rolex, or even Breitling, Cartier or AP. They can afford to ignore the pre-owned vintage market, disregarding it as being too much trouble servicing and restoring antique timepieces. Better to sell customers a new one instead.

Those lesser Swiss brands, like Zenith could well be onto something when they hunt down rare models from their back catalogue and restore, factory fresh once again. There is a loyalty to be won over here, a devoted collector market that will invest in genuine factory resto watches, bit like a Jaguar E-Type recreation.

Here’s the word from Zenith;

After making its debut at Zenith Boutiques in Ginza, Shanghai, the ZENITH ICONS thematic capsule collections of historically significant vintage watches sourced, restored and certified by the Manufacture in Le Locle are finally coming to Zenith’s online boutiques in Europe, Japan and USA. And for its digital introduction, Zenith is offering an exceptionally pristine example of its most coveted early El Primero models in gold, the G381.

First unveiled earlier this week at VIVATECH 2021 in Paris, where Zenith joined LVMH and other group Maisons at what is considered Europe’s biggest startup and tech event at showcasing their latest innovations, the G381 symbolizes the Zenith Manufacture’s approach towards achieving a circular economy.

THE CIRCULAR ECONOMY IS A GOOD THING

Among speakers from the best tech brands and innovative startups, Zenith CEO Julien Tornare talked about how the Manufacture has the unique capacity to restore older products and keep them operating in perpetuity, in line with the core theme of this year’s VIVATECH expo, sustainability. Using past and present resources, components and know-how, watches from the past are given a second, certified life through ZENITH ICONS. Its latest addition, available for the first time exclusively on the Zenith online boutique, is perhaps its most exceptional yet.

An important reference in El Primero lore, the G381 was among the very first gold models designed to house the El Primero in 1969 and is considered the gold counterpart of the iconic A386. It had the same round case, decimal and tachymeter scales, and of course the earliest iteration of the seminal El Primero automatic high-frequency chronograph movement. A highly successful model for Zenith at the same time, it was reproduced in multiple small batches from 1969 to 1972. In total, only 1’000 pieces were ever made.

A GRAIL WATCH FOR A LIFETIME IS A GREEN WATCH

NWC mag can see that using the circular economy tactic goes soem way to head off the climate change zealots at the pass. There are elements in society now who seek to destroy capitalism itself and one of th ways they aim to accomplish this Marxist utopia is to use the `product miles’ argument against luxury goods manufacturers and brand names.

So by restoring watches from the past, brands can argue that new materials are being saved, throwaway `fast fashion’ culture is being rejected, and high quality jobs are being preserved for skilled artisans. It’s a win-win when it comes to combatting the ludicrous foot-stamping of Greta and her chums, so we say, good work Zenith.

Zenith Give The El Primero The Camo Green Treatment

Come on, this is getting boring now Swiss brands. Yep, Zenith has joined the green watch trend with a an olive green El Primero, called the Safari. It doesn’t ding our bell,  it feels a bit washed out, too understated with that matt grey case finish.

Fact is, we love the original El Primero design way too much, this just looks flat – dare we say, a bit cheap?

Anyway here’s the word from Zenith;

When the designers at Zenith asked themselves what an El Primero from 1969 inspired by the great outdoors would look like, they imagined something entirely different from what the Manufacture had produced in over 50 years since the famed calibre’s introduction; something that evoked the vivid colours and textures found on wild terrains with the same utility and ergonomics as its most prized chronographs. The result is the Chronomaster Revival Safari, a lush reinterpretation of a signature vintage chronograph icon.

The geometry and overall proportions of this fresh and modern chronograph are identical to those of the historical A384, but the look and feel of the case couldn’t be more different. Instead of the traditionally finished stainless steel in a mix of satin-brushed and polished surfaces, the Safari is crafted in titanium that’s lighter yet harder than steel. The entire case including the star-emblazoned crown and pump-style pushers are fashioned in an intriguingly muted finish that’s entirely microblasted to bring out the dark nuances of titanium by absorbing light rather than reflecting it.

Exhibiting tones ranging from deep olive-green to cooler spruce tones, the dial of the Chronomaster Revival Safari is a deep matte green with contrasting black registers and tachymeter scale, with a touch of vintage inspiration with its warm beige-coloured SuperLumiNova on the applied baton markers and hands. The white on green date wheel is perfectly camouflaged with the rest of the dial; legible when you need it but never distracting. The rubber and cordura-effect strap takes on the same khaki-green tone as the dial, and is fixed to a matte microblasted titanium pin buckle.

Powering this retro-inspired but resolutely modern and edgy chronograph is the El Primero automatic high-frequency chronograph calibre, visible through the display back. In production since 1969 and gradually evolved throughout the years, this is the closest iteration to the original version of the seminal chronograph movement.

The Chronomaster Revival Safari is ready to go where no El Primero has gone before, and is available from Zenith boutiques & e-commerce from June 2021.

Zenith A3817 Revival is a Bold Delight

One of our fave watch designs of all time, the original El Primero gets a revamp from the modern day Zenith factory; here’s the press release on the A3817 Revival model.

It has a real bold, primary colour punch from the dial compared to some other El Primero variants in the Zenith range. We like that classic chrono pusher look as well. Definitely a cheaper optuion than tracking down an original with paperwork, this one should retail at about £5900 in the UK.

When the El Primero calibre made its groundbreaking debut in 1969, Zenith chose to house it in two broad but distinct watch categories. On one hand, there were sportier models in tonneau-shaped steel cases, such as the A384, and on the other, more classical round cases in steel or gold, most notably the A386.

Released in 1971, the A3817 was the exception to the rule. It combined the sportier steel tonneau-shaped case of the earliest steel El Primero references with the striking tri-colour dial of the A386, resulting in a unique and appealing aesthetic that continues to resonate with vintage chronograph enthusiasts. Given that only 1000 of the A3817 were ever produced, it remains one of the most distinguished, elusive and sought-after references among the early El Primero watches.

The Chronomaster Revival A3817 is crafted in the same angled tonneau-shaped case with pump-style pushers as the original, using historical blueprints and reverse-engineering to preserve the original proportions and finishes.

Zenith waited two years after the launch of the El Primero in 1969 before introducing the iconic tri-colour dial to its sportier tonneau case, albeit with a slightly different execution in both function and aesthetic when compared to the A386.

Like its progenitor of 1971, the Chronomaster Revival A3817 features a white lacquered dial with chronograph counters done in the instantly recognizable tones of grey and blue, with the running seconds counter at 9 o’clock done with blue markers, indicated by the single blue hand on the dial.

The outer tachymeter scale also serves as a pulsometer, an especially handy and precise function provided by the high-frequency 5Hz (36’000 VpH) escapement of the El Primero movement. The seconds track is done in a pyramid pattern affectionately nicknamed the “shark tooth” scale, which enhances legibility with a distinctly retro touch.

Zenith Cohiba 55: If You Got `em, Light `em

Zenith has released a fresh take on its El Primero Chronograph to celebrate 55 years of Cohiba cigars.  They did a brown edition five years ago, but this one has a wild Ducati 748 eyllowness about it which we kinda like.

You get a five pack of cigars included in the deal, which costs £7600 approx (limited to selected retailers by the way). It won’t actually be available until October this year however. Here’s the press release;

From Havana to Le Locle and all over the world, cigar aficionados are celebrating 2021 as the 55th anniversary of one of the most distinguished and revered Cuban cigar makers, Cohiba. Now marking its fifth year of collaboration with Habanos and the sixth special edition with Cohiba, Zenith is joining the celebration with a delectable and highly exclusive commemorative edition of the Chronomaster Open.

Zenith has reimagined its emblematic Chronomaster Open in a manner that immediately evokes Cohiba’s unique aesthetic. Taking on the striking design codes of the packaging and paper bands that wrap each of its entirely hand-rolled and exquisitely blended cigars, the dial of the Chronomaster Open Cohiba 55th anniversary edition is done in the distinct saffron-yellow tone and white on black checkered motif. A yellow chronograph seconds hand with a star-shaped counterweight completes the look, while the black alligator leather strap harmoniously accentuates the checkered pattern of the dial.

Limited to just 55 pieces, the Chronomaster Open Cohiba 55th anniversary edition is completed with a special display back with the special Cohiba 55 logo printed on the interior side of the sapphire crystal. To enjoy the full epicurean experience, each watch will come with a set of 5 special Cohiba cigars presented in an exclusive
cobranded porcelain jar.

The Chronomaster Cohiba 55th anniversary edition will be available exclusively at Zenith boutiques and select retailers around the world from October 2021.

The Cult of MOD: Swiss Style

Many watch fans know and love Seiko MOD watches. There are several specialists out there making stunning Prospex/SKX or NH35 powered watches with a variety of beautiful dials, bezels and hands. It’s a cult thing that is definitely growing fast and it isn’t unusual to see some Seiko MOD dive models on eBay for over £700. Yep, not a genuine new Seiko, a refurbished, pre-owned model for 700 notes.

So we wondered, will the same process work its way through the older Swiss watches available online? Then we stumbled on Vinmov watches in Hungary and they are doing some very cool stuff. In fact the thing we love about Vinmov is that they’re showing off classic Swiss movements that thave been tucked away behind steel casebacks for the last 40-60 years.

So you can but a stunning Omega Vinmov, with a see-thru caseback showing the 552 or 471 series automatic movements, in all their copper-rose glory. If you love watches then you probably admire classic Omega movements for their exceptional reliability and durability. Plus they often look pretty good, and that cannot be said of some later Omega automatic movements. The watches come in 40mm cases mostly, which is an ideal way to rehome vintage movements we reckon and give them a more modern appeal, rather than the original 34-37mm case sizes that many 60s/70s Swiss watches favoured.

The dials are almost all punchy black plates with orange or red accents, plus a hefty black bezel set with dive minute numbers. Some, like the blue Zenith with stars on the dial and yellow accents, don’t really do it for us. They look a little too 1970s hotel carpet. The hands are new and the lume is bright too, which is something you don’t get on the older 60s/70s Swiss dress watches in the main.

But Vinmov has a wide range of designs and we love some of their Omega, Longines, Buren and there’s a gold coloured Favre Leuba that really hits the spot in our eyes. You get a manufacturer warranty with these vintage MOD watches, which is an advantage over buying old watches on eBay, as generally you have 14 days refund time, and then you own it – problems n all. We like what Vinmov are doing here, giving new life to older Swiss movements that may well be salvaged from unpopular Presentation watch cases, or simply a case and dial that has degraded over time.

If you want to build your own MOD watch then Vinmov also have plenty of older, and very clean, vintage movements for sale on their own. Prices for complete watches start at about £250.

The circular economy never looked so good. More here.

Zenith Defy Pantone Is Designer Heaven

No not designer label stuff. This is art. Zenith have added a bit of Apple Mac designer cred to their Defy model, with the Pantone special edition. Here’s the word from Zenith;

A global sensation in the world of contemporary art, Argentinian-Spanish artist Felipe Pantone has reached his star in becoming one of the brightest talents in the world of contemporary art. Instantly recognizable, polarizing and never leaving observers indifferent, Felipe Pantone’s work is coveted by art-lovers and those with an eye for radical design. Zenith and Felipe Pantone began their collaboration in 2020, when the Manufacture offered the façade of its main building as a canvas to the contemporary artist. Now, Felipe Pantone has reimagined Zenith’s most advanced chronograph to date, created an object that is at once a feat exceptional watchmaking prowess and a piece of wearable kinetic art.

Too jazzy? Not for us, we are old school CMYK press barons.

The result from this unexpected yet coherent collaboration is the DEFY 21 Felipe Pantone, a strikingly colourful creation that is all about playing with frequencies – visually and mechanically. With its 1/100th of a second El Primero 21 chronograph movement beating at an extremely high frequency of 360’000 vibrations per hour for unrivalled precision, the DEFY 21 is a logical choice of canvas onto which Felipe Pantone could express his “visible spectrum concept”, where all the detectable frequencies of light and its refracted colours come into play with the highest-frequency chronograph in production. Limited to 100 pieces, the DEFY 21 Felipe Pantone is a new kind of collaboration for Zenith and watchmaking at large.

On his first watch collaboration, Felipe Pantone shared “I’m thrilled and humbled to be able to give my personal touch to a watch for the first time, and especially with a manufacture that I deeply admire for its innovation and daringness. From the start, the concept was to transform this spectacular piece of watchmaking into a wearable work of kinetic art, where time and light converge into a single object. I couldn’t be more thrilled with the result.”

The moiré optical effect produced by thin alternating white and black bands is a recurring theme in Felipe Pantone’s paintings and sculptures, which has been miniaturized and reproduced on the top bridges and portions of the dial of the DEFY 21 Felipe Pantone, using fine laser-engraving and lacquering techniques so precise that they provide an optical illusion of fluidic movement in the contrast of the stripes. The open dial is no less dynamic, with a mix of gradient and block colours on the markers and counters.

Even the inanimate, external parts of the DEFY 21 Felipe Pantone case have been revisited by Felipe Pantone for a dynamic overhaul. The black ceramic DEFY 21 features a grid pattern engraved on the bezel, and “FP#1” engraved on the four corners of the case, denoting “Felipe Pantone El Primero”.  Allowing the various details of the chromatic dial and movement to stand out, the artist opted for a black textured rubber strap with a warped grid motif.

Zenith’s Latest El Primero A385 Revival is a Fume Dial Beauty

Latest incarnation of the Zenith El Primero retro editions is a serious piece of homage, and just released by Zenith for the new year. Here’s the press info;

A legend is born again: Zenith is bringing back one of the earliest and most emblematic El Primero-equipped chronographs from the earliest days of the revolutionary calibre in the form of a Chronomaster Revival model.

The A385 made headlines back in 1970, when it took part in Zenith’s “Operation Sky”. This extreme test consisted of strapping the watch to an Air France Boeing 707’s landing gear on a flight from Paris to New York to test its resistance to external aggressions such as drastic temperature fluctuations, wind force and changing air pressure. Upon landing, the watch was still functioning perfectly. This daring feat was a testament to the confidence those who had tirelessly worked on the El Primero calibre held, as well as tangible proof that a mechanical movement was superior to the nascent quartz movements of the time, which couldn’t have stood the temperature differences endured by the watch during the flight.

After over 50 years, the time has come for the A385 to make its return in the form of a Chronomaster Revival model. Far more than just a vintage-inspired creation, the Chronomaster Revival A385 is an actual reproduction of the original model from 1969 in an exercise of “reverse engineering” by the Manufacture. Using the original blueprints and production plans, each part of the A385’s 37mm tonneau-shaped stainless steel case, including the pump-style pushers, is faithful to the original 1969 model. The only differences, are the domed sapphire crystal instead of an acrylic glass and the display back instead of the closed solid steel case back, offering an unobstructed view of the El Primero 400 chronograph movement.

Verdict: At £7500 or so for the bracelet version, and about £7000 for the leather strap version, this is an expensive trip down memory lane. OK, you’ll never find a mint condition tropical fume dial El Primero now, 50 years later, with box n papers. But will a 37mm case sized watch really stand out on the wrist as a great statement for that hefty price tag?

Maybe the better option is to go old school and buy a genuine 1969-71 model? We found an original El Primero A385 with the brown fume dial – no box or papers – for £4600 on Chron24, plus a 1970 brown fume dial model from a German dealer at £7300. The channces are that the true originals will hold their value – or increase – when compared to the modern day revival.

Although you lose accurate timekeeping, and have no factory guarantee, you may just end up with a watch that makes a few grand over the next 5-10 years. Having said that your cash is probably safer in a nice Rolex Sub for the next decade. Oh and buy a safe. And a large dog.