Tag Archives: timex

Coke Themed Timex Editions On The Way

Timex have some Coca-Cola themed watches in the pipeline. The pics on the Timex site suggest that there’sa  classic 80s retro digital model, an automatic featuring a 70s Peace graphic, plus a basic quartz with an onion crown and pocket watch style case, in the range.

All have Coke branding on the dials. Soon as we get more info we shall let you know. As you were.

Timex American Documents: MadeWorn Remix

Timex has a new collab model in its American Documents range, which has been produced by MadeWorn

It has a real vintage, Speed Shop or Vice Grip Garage feel to it – hey there’s an idea, VGG watches, rescued as dead Timex, Hamilton or Bulova models and refurbished with new or salvaged parts.

Anyhoo, we digress. The MadeWorn Docs model has a parchment sort of dial, kinda ying and yang colours too. That represents day plus night says Timex but we prefer to think of it as a more Zen and The Art of Motorcycle Maintenance vibe.

The whole watch is a hand-crafted, aged product, even the leather strap has a patina. The watch box too. So you get that unique, one-off flavour for a cool 800 bucks or so – plus UK import duty, VAT, shipping etc.

Verdict; we want to see more collab stuff from Timex, like a Bear Grylls Indigo Adventurer, or maybe a Roland Sands of Time watch – yeah, see what we did there?

More at Timex UK, who don’t retail the MadeWorn special by the way, but do have some very nice new Timex watches like the original American Documents model, the Navi Automatic, or the retro 80 digital models.

 

Timex Continues With Retro Groove

Timex is staying on the retro path with new colour choices for the Q Reissue series, including a deep blue dial/bezel combo that we love.  It has a 38mm case, steel bracelet, easy-change battery compartment on the caseback – all that good stuff from the past, with a modern quartz movement inside.

It is a great looker although £175 is expensive for a basic fashion watch. Rivals from Sekonda, Accurist, even a Seiko 5, can be had for about £110. Just saying.

Now if you rock the Pride month then the Timex Malibu models will be right up your alley. Featuring Miami art deco colours, these watches have a 36mm case width, quartz movt, acrylic crystal and gold tone painted bracelets, which are the expandable type.

Good news for older customers who often miss these expanding links, although taking the pins out to remove links can be a bit of a faff, even for jewellers and watch shops.

Bizarrely, they feature a rotating bezel, which seems pointless on a fashion watch but still. Price is £175.

More info on  the UK Timex site here.

Vintage Quartz Watches, Yea or No Way?

There are some early quartz watches that fetch incredible prices. If you have an original Bulova Accurton, a Seiko Astron from the late 60s or a Casio calculator watch from the early 80s, then you’ll be happy to know that values are rising.

Of course these are ground-breaking watches of their time, and deserve respect from collectors. Seiko, more than any brand, revolutionised watch sales with their cheaper quartz watches. They were still expensive mond you, I recall buying a basic black Casio digital for £20 back in the early 80s – which was almost half a week’s wages – because the Seiko digital was too fancy at £29.99.

Naturally, that Casio went to the bin decades ago, just like all the digital watches I bought in the 1980s and the quartz watches I bought in the 1990s too. But recently I have bought a few old quartz models, generally the Lanco, Timex and Seiko SQ models, plus a brand new, big 43mm Pulsar I liked just because it had a groovy teal coloured chronograph.

Apart from Seiko SQ50/100 models, I always suggest people avoid the older quartz watches because they aren’t so reliable, or so easy to revive from their comatose state when people leave them in drawers and the batteries split open, then leak that green oxide shit all over the place.

I did buy a running Lanco from the early 70s, which has the Tissot 7067 movement in it, last year. This actually went OK after a little clean of the contacts and a new Renata 301 battery inside. But the time-setting malarkey on this watch is franly a bit silly.

You pull the crown out and it moves the hour hand, like many older Omega quartz watches by the way. But there is no second pull-out position to move the minute hand.

I googled the problem and found that you have to hold the crown down for 5 seconds, then release, then tap it again to make the minute hand twirl around.

Nope. No joy. The most likely cause is that the stepper  motor isn’t engaging with the gear wheel to make that magic happen, but considering the Lanco is probably worth under £75 at auction, I cannot be bothered taking it apart.

SPARES PROBLEMS

Another annoyance with this Lance is the usual Tissot/Omega/Lanco tension ring holding the crytal in, and it is a front-loader diassembly routine. So crystal off, hands off, crown n stem out etc and then release the movement. I will be blunt, I hate that obtuse thinking by the Tissot/Lanco group. Timex did the same thing for decades.

Basically it was a ploy to create work for their authorised repair network by making life difficult for the amateur watch fettler. The more you mess with old crystals held in by thin rings of metal, the more likely you are to scratch dials or break the tension rings or hands.

So yep, messing with old quartz watches is a good way to end up hunting for rare spare crystals, hands and tension rings too. All these delicate parts often rust into position after 50 years, or simply get brittle and begin to crumble away.

My solution to the hand-setting problem was to disconnect the battery and wait until exactly 2.41pm to re-fit and slide the connector tab across it, since that was where the minute hand had stopped at.

So I have a running Lanco quartz, kinda nice looking, new battery in place and a neat sort of Tiger’s Eye effect on the dial as well. Like many old watches, it isn’t perfect and it will probably never be worth more than £100 even if I live to be 90. By that time everyone will have a chip inserted in their arm that tells the time, reads your bad thoughts and automatically emails the Solyent Green factory when your fridge is out of vegan ping meals.

Enjoy your watches I say, it’s later than you think.

Timex Q 1978 is Pure Starsky & Hutch

Timex is reviving the 1970s in fine style with the Q 1978 quartz model. Featuring the handy coin-operated battery cover on the caseback, this baby has that tonneau case design that denoted the 70s for many watch fans.

You get a 37mm case diameter plus a vintage style acrylic crystal too, which may not be super resistant to scratches, but it is a piece of cake to replace it with the right watch tool and new high dome crystal. It’s a functional watch with a day/date feature and silver coloured dial, plus a retro style plain black leather strap. We love what Timex are doing in terms of tapping into its rich heritage right now and a gold plated case version of this 1978 model would be a welcome addition we rekcon.

There is a little Starsky & Hutch style video to promote the watch which retails at £155 in the UK. Just slightly too pricey for us and may we suggest a Seiko 5 for £100 or therabouts, or an Accurist retro racer at £129 as alternative choices?

Timex M79 Auto Has a Batman Spirit Animal

Timex automatics are pretty fair value, although the Miyota movement found inside them is very similar to the one found in an Accurist auto at half the price. But then again, we buy watches because they look the part and the M79 certainly does that. Seaparated at birth from a Rolex GMT Batman? Well, yeah, you could say that at a distance. So if you want a 40mm auto that looks retro but kinda modern too, theis fits the bill for £255 we reckon.

Blue/Black or Red/Black bezel options by the way. See-thru caseback, acrylic crystal, stainless steel case and bracelet – 50m resistance. Here is the word from Timex;

Our M79 Automatic is something entirely new, even though it might look familiar. Inspired by the 1970s Q Timex and elevated with a 21-jewel mechanical movement, this watch is a fresh interpretation of a much-loved Timex® icon. Powered by your movement, this automatic watch packs a 40-hour power reserve and can also be wound manually by using the crown. Featuring a unidirectional black and red bezel, black dial with luminous markings, a woven stainless-steel bracelet and exhibition case back, this modern watch captures the bold spirit of an era that changed everything.

Timex Launch Todd Snyder Q Ship & Nigel’s Retro Naval Model

Two recent models from Timex that we just spotted on their UK website. OK yeah, we know they launched before Christmas but we were double busy.

First up is the Todd Snyder quartz Q model. This is part of the revival Q seies, taking inspiration from the Timex quartz watches of the 80s. They have that handy feature where you can change the battery yourself with a 20p coin, which is nice.

“The next evolution of our much-loved Q Timex 1979 Reissue watch, a special edition made exclusively for Todd Snyder adds a black dial with red accents and a new stainless-steel bracelet to the iconic features of the original — a rotating bezel, functional battery hatch, day-date feature, luminant hands and domed acrylic crystal. It’s everything you already loved, and then some.” says Timex.

Then there’s the Nigel Cabourn naval style watch.

“Following multiple sold-out collaborations with British menswear designer Nigel Cabourn, we’ve teamed up with the brand once again to give you the Naval Officers Watch. This watch draws inspiration from timepieces worn by Royal Navy captains on Arctic convoys in the North Sea during WWII, with a specially finished case made to emulate sea-air corrosion, a nod to the weathered look of military boats and seafaring equipment of the era. Featuring a white military-style dial with red and black markings, and presented with two straps in a military-style carrying case, this collaboration delivers a real tribute to wartime functionality as well as rugged, ageless style.”

We like that it’s a watch in a tin, rather like old school tobacco, pencils or even mints – yeah, chocolates and mints used to be sold openly in tins. Plastic packaging was a distant dream back in 60s Britain. This retro delight retails at £159. More info at Timex UK.

Timex Marmont Captures The 1975 Look Better Than…The 1975

There’s a lot to be said for a Timex reissue quartz model, as you get modern technology in a case and dial style that brings back those 70s vibes. The Marmont is a case in point at £155, which is admittedly quite a bit for a watch brand that was once considered a budget choice. You can get a nice Accurist, Skagen, Sekonda or Seiko for less.

This Day-Date model, captures the Timex look circa 1975  – the year that is, not the rock band – and has been recreated for today – with a stainless-steel case and plated gold-tone finish, functional battery hatch, day-date feature and its unique case design.

Timex also says; Because it belongs to our Q Timex family, you’ll find the same perfect touches as always — our “Q” logo on the dial, a reliable and accurate quartz movement inside, and our easy coin-slot battery hatch on the case back to save you from service trips to the nearest jeweler, if and when you need a battery change. Have to admit that saves you cash as you aren’t paying someone a fiver a time, or more, to change your battery every few years.

Continuing with the watch’s retro stylings, its dial is brushed with a sunray texture and finished in a cool champagne color. The dial markings are wonderfully dynamic and dimensional, with their own polished facets that catch the light and interact with the dial’s surface finishing and the light refractions of the domed crystal.

The Q Timex Marmont comes with an elegant black leather strap, debossed in a retro alligator pattern, plus a buckle to match its case with a period-correct widened strap keeper. As an homage to one of our iconic originals, this watch does more than sit on your wrist or rest in a box — it gathers light and glows with it, shining through the years to reflect its wearer as much as a watch ever could.

Timex Q Watches Capture The Spirit of 1979 Perfectly

First released in the 1970s, the original Q Timex watches were quartz powered and replaced an ageing mechanical and auto line-up.

Now the modern Timex company has launched Q Timex 1979 Reissue, with bright pops of colour added to the iconic features of the original — a rotating bezel, woven stainless-steel bracelet, functional battery hatch and domed acrylic crystal.

In orange, green, and a Pepsi blue/red combo the Q range offer old school looks with a chunky bracelet and that vintage battery cover on the back. Yep, you can use a 20p coin to unlock and fit a new battery yourself. Easy peasy.

At £159 these Timex Reissues aren’t cheap, but they do have a retro style that sets them apart – plus a steel bracelet, which many people prefer to leather. Simple reason; straps wear and split, bracelets can last a decade with care.

timex auot 40mm m79

There’s also a new Timex M79 retro style auto on the way, which is 40mm case size and features a handsome Batman bezel, plus see-thru caseback. That is priced at £249.

There is a summer sale on now, with 30% off the Marlin and Waterbury gents models by the way. More here. 

 

Timex PAC-MAN is a Kick Up The Eighties

Here’s a confession, the first watch I ever owned was a Timex mechanical. Technically, it was bought for my 10th birthday so I didn’t pay hard cash, but what a feeling it was to wind that tiny 33mm watch up and see the second hand running.

Then came the 80s and I bought a Casio digital watch with one of my big overtime wage packets, yes people got paid in cash every Thursday night back then! Crazy. That Casio probably cost about half a week’s pay, say £25, which was serious money. But digital anything was so cool then, including games like PAC-MAN™

You could visit arcades and even pubs in the 80s across Britain and find a PAC-MAN machine lurking in a corner, hoping to relieve you of any spare 50p coins.

Now Timex has recreated the early 80s vibe, with a PAC-MAN’s 40th anniversary edition model. It features all the functions you’d expect from a T80, like an alarm, stopwatch and date display, but also plays the iconic PAC-MAN melody and has a retro flair to spare.

We would say it is ideal for an 80s themed retro night out, but then, when are we going to be allowed back out and dance like Marty McFly or Kevin Bacon again? Maybe 2021.

Meanwhile, channel the decade of Spandau Ballet, Adam Ant, The Young Ones and Top Gun on your wrist. It retails for $79 in the USA, and £69 in the UK.