Japanese Watches

Workshop Report: Basic Refurb on an Orient 3 Star Automatic

orient refurb 1
This Orient had obviously suffered a tough life on ebay – note the dirt stuck to the 11 o’clock baton market under the scratched crystal – but it did run OK, so I started by getting the movement out and giving it a clean.
orient refurb 2
Quite a crudely made movement from Orient, a sub-brand of Seiko’s empire. Note the black marker on the lugs indicating this was a joblot sale at some point.
orient 3 stem
Removing the stem revealed a layer of dirt, plus evidence of over-oiling. All went in the ether bath, once the movement had been cleaned of course. I placed one drop of watch oil on the stem before re-fitting btw, just to make setting the hands that bit slicker – my own view is anything you can do to ease the burden on a setting lever that’s 40 years old is a good move, because if it bends or breaks, a watch like this isn’t worth a total stripdown to repair the keyless works. #Justsaying 
orient refurb 4 glue
I used the plastic die press to get the old crystal out, which shattered – reason was clear, someone had glued a replacement glass in at some stage. Note superglue residue in the bezel rim – all had to be painstakingly removed via toothpick.
orient 5 clean bezel
All glue removed now. While the movement was out overnight, I spent time polishing the steel case as best I could to minimise the 30-35 years of scratches n scuffs. Plus washed off the marker pen number on the lugs, using a dab of acetone on a soft cotton pad.
orient 6 new crystal
If this was a customer watch I would source a flat mineral glass crystal, but a cheap n cheerful acrylic hi-dome from the spares stash does the same job, and just pushes in using the crystal lift tool. Before re-fitting the hands, and putting the movement back in the watch, I used an art brush to gently clean the baton markers and dial – be very careful not to use any solvents on the dial or markers, as the dial coating will simply strip right off in 90% of cases.
orient 7 back
It’s worth spending 15 mins polishing the caseback, picking dirt from the indents, and fitting a new silicone seal, plus a replacement strap. The end result is a decent looking vintage watch that now keeps good time.

If you like what you see and you have a vintage wind-up, or automatic watch that you would like to have fettled, then send a DM on Twitter @warrWatchCo anytime. Prices start at £35 for a basic clean, plus insured post of £6.50.

Or you can email; warringtonwatchco@outlook.com and send as many photos as possible for a quote on repairs.

 

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